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January 30th, 2012

There are times when you may want to capture what is currently being shown on your iPad's screen. That’s easy to do on an iPad.

Simply press the Home button and then the Sleep/Wake button simultaneously. When you hear a click, the screenshot has been taken. You can then go to the photos gallery to see all of your captured screenshots.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips
January 30th, 2012

The big difference between Android and the iOS is the fact that, on an Android device, you can play Flash videos. There are times however when this seeming advantage can be a disadvantage as Flash (such as Flash ads) can slow down your browsing experience or even crash your browser. There is a solution.

You can turn off Flash if you choose to. Simply go to your Browser's Settings by pressing on the Menu/Options button, then go to Advanced and change 'Enable plug-ins' setting from "Always on" to "On demand." Flash applications will now appear as an arrow that you must touch to start.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips
January 10th, 2012

If you own an Android phone, you can use it as a substitute for an external drive or a USB key. You can load files into your phone simply by plugging it in to a PC with a USB cable, then tapping on “Mount” when you are prompted by the system.

This mounts the internal storage of the device as an external drive relative to the PC, and you can easily drag and drop files or create folders on the device as you see fit. Of course, it is recommended you do this on the SDCard that likely came with the device, or one that you buy for your phone.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

January 2nd, 2012

If you are using Windows Gadgets (or those small mini-applications that are embedded on your desktop that show interesting things like the latest news, weather updates, or sports scores), you may sometimes wish you can just quickly hide them to declutter your workspace.

In Windows 7, you can do just that. Simply right-click on the desktop, go to View, and then clear the check mark on Show desktop gadgets. This will hide the gadgets. If you want to bring them back, just restore the check mark again.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips
December 23rd, 2011

Have you ever sent an email and then immediately regretted sending it? If you are using Gmail as your mail client, you can do just that with an interesting but buried option in Gmail settings.

To enable this feature, go to Mail Settings in Gmail (upper right corner, under the gear icon). Navigate to the "Labs" tab. In the labs search box, look for "Undo Send" and choose Enable, then save. Now in Mail Settings you will see an option to "Undo Send: Send cancellation period: __ seconds." Enter the number of seconds that Gmail will allow you to change your mind in the future (try 10 seconds).

With this enabled, the next time you send an email, you’ll be able to “Cancel” it from being sent out, as long as it is within the time frame you specified.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips
December 15th, 2011

Do you prefer Bing over Google but like Google's sparse but fast loading page better? With this tip you can get the best of both worlds.

As users of Bing know, when you visit the home page of Bing, a page with a featured photo as the background is displayed by default, which increases the load time of the page. This can be distracting or annoyingespecially if you have a slow connection. Disable this photo from loading by simply bookmarking this URL (http://www.bing.com/?rb=0). The next time you visit Bing, the photo will not appear.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips
December 12th, 2011

Many of us herald our abilities to multitask these days, citing our computers, smartphones and the like as the tools that help us get things done. Our constant access to email and the internet allow us to always stay connected and receive updates regarding important information every moment of our day.

I love my iPhone and laptop and admit that I would be lost without them. In fact our entire team heavily utilizes our phones and emails, but I’m noticing more and more how the tools I use to organize my life can also be a huge distraction for me and research suggests that I’m not alone. In fact, research tells us that when we are performing tasks that require language processing or decision making, we are not actually multitasking at all but simply “task switching” and that doing this task switching causes us to experience stress and poor performance as we constantly have to ask ourselves at some level, “now where was I?” In the words of Joanne Cantor, author of Conquering CyberOverload: Get More Done, Boost Your Creativity, and Reduce Stress,  “when you are multitasking, you’re dimming your bulb, depowering your  brain.”

Unfortunately those constant emails popping up in the lower right hand corner of our screen, text messages and social media updates also cause us to task switch as we are forced to respond to these interruptions (even if it’s just a moment’s attention). As our access to constant information increases, so do our interruptions and this very well could affect the quality of our work and that of our employees if we don’t learn to use the tools at our disposal consciously and effectively.

I believe our computers, smartphones and the like have the power to enhance the speed, efficiency and quality of our work when used wisely, but doing so requires some attention. I predict that weighing the positive and negative effects of “information overload” and staying constantly connected will become an issue of much debate  for businesses in the near future. Fortunately there are practical things we can do to help us get the most out of our tools without losing productivity. One example is to switch your email from synching with your server every minute to every 15 minutes or longer if you can so that you are not constantly bombarded with email notifications, or scheduling times throughout the day to check your email, leaving the program closed otherwise.

For more information and tools on how to effectively use technology and media check out Joanne Cantor’s blog on Psychology Today. I have found it to be a great resource!

-Heather Remer, MA

Topic Tech Tips
December 5th, 2011

Did you know that on iOS5 on the iPad, you can actually split the keyboard into two? This can be useful for typing with your thumbs if you are holding the iPad with both hands.

To do so, press and hold the keyboard icon on the on-screen keyboard. An option will appear, allowing you to split the keyboard into two. Alternatively you can drag the keyboard icon up across the screen until the keyboard splits up. Still another way is to simply put two fingers around the center of the keyboard and simultaneously drag them apart in a splitting motion.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips
November 25th, 2011

Want to do a quick currency conversion? You can use Google for that. Simply type in the amount in the original currency, then the currency you want to convert it to.

For example, type in: "100 dollars in yen" or "100 dollars in Mexican Pesos" and check out the results. If you have a mobile data plan on your mobile phone with a browser, you can use this tip for quick currency conversions on the go.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips
November 18th, 2011

The Mac introduced the concept of using multiple "Desktops" (previously called "Spaces") using Lion's Mission Control application. Using Mission Control, you can specify which desktop applications will automatically open in which desktops by default.

To set your preferences, select and right-click (or ctrl+click or two-finger click) on an application in the Dock, then select the "Options" menu in the resulting pop-over. Inside that menu, links appear that allow you to remove the app from the Dock, open it at Login, or to have it Show in the Finder app. If you have multiple desktops active, an additional set of options will appear at the bottom. Here you can "assign" the app to "This Desktop" or the current active desktop, or to open in "All Desktops" or "None." Make your selection and your app will now open in the specific Desktop or Desktops you specify on launch.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Tech Tips